Tick Surveillance Update

Every year Alberta Agriculture and Forestry continues their Surveillance of Ticks on Companion Animals program. The newest data is from 2017, as the 2018 report is still being compiled. In general the tick population is on the rise, but fortunately in Alberta the risk of being bitten by a tick carrying the bacteria responsible for Lyme disease is low.

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Summer Fear and Stress Support for Your Pet

Summer means festivities, get-togethers, fireworks and thunderstorms. While we might enjoy a brilliant firework display, getting together with friends around a campfire or a loud, electrifying thunderstorm our pets might think otherwise. If your pet is scared, uneasy or anxious over the summer there are many products (most over the counter) that can be used to relax and support your pet though the summer weather, events and celebrations.

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Ticks and your Pet

Ticks are eight-legged parasites that have highly developed mouthparts. They bite to fasten themselves onto the skin and feed on blood. Luckily, most ticks do not cause serious health problems. It is however, important to remove a tick as soon as possible to avoid potential infection or diseases and submit it for testing.

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Canine Parvovirus

Canine parvovirus (CPV) is a highly contagious viral disease that affects dogs. The majority of the cases are usually seen in puppies between 6 weeks and 6 months of age. Dogs with suppressed immune systems and dogs that are un-vaccinated or not completely vaccinated are also at risk of contracting the virus. Most deaths from CPV happen within 48 to 72 hours following the onset of clinical signs. Without treatment, prognosis for recovery is very guarded for this disease

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Poison and Toxicity

Poisoning and toxicities can happen at any time. Usually the cause of the poisoning is due to a combination of human error and mischievous pets. Toxic substances left unattended may be accidentally ingested by pets. Toxic foods left out on the counter or table will be no match to a determined pet. Plant toxicities may occur if you were unaware the plant was actually toxic, or if they are in areas of your house where they are in reach of your pet.

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Canine Breed Spotlight: Rottweiler

The Rottweiler is thought to be one of the oldest herding breeds. They may be descendants of ancient Roman drover dogs (a mastiff-type dog) that traveled to Germany with the Romans as guard and herding dogs of the cattle that the Romans traveled with. One of the towns where the Romans set up a colony was named das Rote Wil when it was discovered. It is thought that this is where the name Rottweiler originated. Once rail transport replaced cattle drives, the Rottweiler almost become extinct. The need for police dogs surged near the beginning of World War I and this lead to the revival of the breed. The popularity of this breed continued to grow from then on, reaching the peak of its popularity in the mid-1990s.

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Feline Breed Spotlight: Munchkin

The Munchkin cat came from a natural genetic mutation causing a cat to have short legs. The gene for the short, turned out legs has a dominant inheritance pattern, similar to Corgis and Dachshunds. This is a new breed of cat, recognized by The International Cat Association in the late 1990s. Even though the breed is new, short legged cats are not a new thing. There are reports of short legged cats from around the world since the 1940s. In the 1980s a stray cat gave birth to a litter with some short legged kittens. One male from this litter, as well as the mother cat were the basis from where the breed known today originated from. Breeding programs for new breeds have a genetics committee to monitor breeding data to oversee the development of the breed. Outcrosses to domestic shorthairs and longhairs are used to ensure a diverse gene pool as this breed continues to develop.

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Canine Coronavirus

This breed of cat originates in France. They are known for their woolly blue-grey double coats, which look similar to a Spanish wood called la pile des Chartreux.  This is thought to be where their name came from. They are exceptional hunters and are highly prized by farmers because of their mousing and ratting skills.  Besides their woolly coat, they are known to have orange or copper colored eyes, large and muscular bodies with shorter legs and they tend to have a “smile”  due to the structure of their heads and their tapered muzzles. The Chartreux is a very rare breed of cat (the breed almost went extinct during World War I). They were imported to North America in the 1970s.

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Leptospirosis in Dogs

Leptospirosis is a bacterial infection that dogs can get when the Leptospira bacteria penetrate the skin and spread through the body via the bloodstream. Leptospira bacteria are usually found in warm, humid areas and in stagnant water. Wild animals such as skunks, foxes and raccoons can also be carriers of the bacteria. The bacteria is shed and spread by the urine of infected animals. Dogs can become infected through exposure to contaminated water (by ingestion or contact through broken skin), exposure to urine from an infected animal (contaminated food or bedding, etc) or through bite wounds. It is important to know that the Leptospira bacteria is zoonotic, meaning that it can be transmitted to humans and other animals.

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Dogs, Medical InformationKari